The Student News Site of Mission Hills High School

The Silvertip

The Student News Site of Mission Hills High School

The Silvertip

The Student News Site of Mission Hills High School

The Silvertip

Energy Drink Epidemic

Junior+Mariah+Lambert+with+her+daily+energy+drink
Photo by Calee Leavitt
Junior Mariah Lambert with her daily energy drink

Energy drinks relentlessly spark controversy regarding their benefits and health issues that arise as a result of consistent consumption. Not only does this controversy occur in the realm of adults, but according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, “almost one-third of teens between 12 and 17 years drink them regularly.” As a result, the Silvertip decided to get the opinions of Mission Hills students who regularly consume energy drinks. Students were asked the benefits they observe after consumption, and any disadvantages or symptoms they experience as well.
The most commonly mentioned energy drinks when interviewing students at Mission Hills were Celsius, Reign, Monster, Ghost, and Redbull. Celsius is currently banned by both the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Olympic Committee due to the drink having a multitude of illegal performance stimulants. Not to mention, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also not approved Celsius for similar reasons. Monster Energy drinks have endured many lawsuits regarding the drink causing life-altering issues. Even being aware of the potential health issues, a large number of teenagers still opt to consume energy drinks on a regular basis.
“It gives me energy if I’m tired after school so I can workout, [and] it helps me regain energy I lost during the day,” freshman Blake Montgomery said. Montgomery stated that he consumes Celsius and Redbull consistently, but he does report some notable side effects. “My hands get really shaky, and I get overly hyper. Sometimes I feel my heartbeat is irregular.”
A common issue high school students face is tiredness and getting up for school in the mornings. Alex Cruz reports that drinking Celsius “helps [him] get up faster,” and helps when he is doing an activity that “requires a lot of energy.” However, Cruz also said that when considering work that requires a lot of focus, he has “developed a dependency [on] them.” In summary, Cruz stated that he cannot complete intensive tasks without an energy drink beforehand.
Celeste Vaca Jimenez brought up another issue that isn’t commonly considered when considering energy drinks. She said that although her Monster and Redbull “allow [her] to be more awake and focused for the time being,” energy drinks “do not let [her] be hungry after [she drinks] one.” Therefore, energy drinks are causing a loss of appetite for high school students, which proves to be a large problem. Jimenez also reports “headaches after drinking them,” which is a hindrance to academic performance in school, and another large problem for high school students.
Student Jon Class happens to be a very successful athlete at Mission Hills; he led the Mission Hills football team in total sacks this past season. Class reports that when drinking his favorite energy drink, Reign, he has “momentary improved focus and energy.” However, he also reports a number of alarming side effects. “Headaches, nausea, fast heart rate. Lots of bad things.”
Overall, there are clear benefits of drinking energy drinks for teenagers whose schedules and capacities are always overflowing. However, the almost inevitable harm that can occur immediately or even years in the future after consuming energy drinks is far from worth it. Four out of the six students interviewed reported they are attempting to quit drinking energy drinks, because they are aware of the certain dangers of consistent consumption.
“I need to quit,” admits Montgomery. “I know they’re bad for me.”

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About the Contributors
Lucy Garrity, Sports Editor
Lucy Garrity is a senior, and this is her first year in the Silvertip. Lucy is a part of many activities on campus, such as NHS, Link Crew, and I Am AP. She also participates in 2 sports on campus, volleyball and lacrosse. Lucy takes pride in her role of presidency at the National Honors Society, and her athletic awards throughout her high school career, including MVP and Coach's award. Writing is another one of Lucy’s passions, and she is taking AP Literature this year to exemplify her passion.
Calee Leavitt, Photography Editor
Calee Leavitt is a junior, and this is her first year of being in Silvertip. She would like to see the world in a different lens. This is her second year being a photographer for sports and many more events here at school. She had started taking photos of sports last year, and She has been working for OneTV/GSPN for 2 years now. Calee thinks that silvertip is a good way to provide the school with information, dates, and stories on different occasions/events through a newspaper. She really wants to improve of my photography skills whilst capturing moments of the field/court and or in the crowd also. She hopes to finish this class with more knowledge in writing newspapers and capturing photos with lots of emotions in them. Calee also joined journalism because she thinks this class is something that she can learn about. Her dream is to get a degree in either photojournalism or just photography.