The Frights are pushing for tomorrow with their new album “Everything Seems Like Yesterday”

The Frights' most recent album "Everything Seems Like Yesterday" has redefined their sound and pulls at the heartstrings of their listeners

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The Frights are pushing for tomorrow with their new album “Everything Seems Like Yesterday”

The Frights new album opens eyes to The Frights new style.

The Frights new album opens eyes to The Frights new style.

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

The Frights new album opens eyes to The Frights new style.

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

The Frights new album opens eyes to The Frights new style.

Story by Bri Hernandez, Sports Editor

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   Surf-punk band, The Frights, kicked into the decade with a new sound on their album “Everything Seems Like Yesterday.” Leading up to the album’s release, the band seemed to be completely silent; all of their previous Instagram posts were deleted and replaced with blank-white pictures and at-home recording set-ups. Fan questions about the account’s strange posts were answered when the band finally released new music on Jan. 25th. 

   Before “Everything Seems Like Yesterday,” The Frights were known for the very angry and fast sound that they had carried with them since their start in 2012. With albums like “The Frights,” “You Are Going to Hate This,” and “Hypochondriac,” the band earned their title as a punk band. However, this year the band’s lead vocalist and guitarist, Mikey Carnevale, has developed a whole new sound for fans to experience. 

I really liked [the new album]. I read a little about it. Mikey said he never really sat down and wrote songs, and that he found the experience of making this album really therapeutic. It was more personal to his own sound rather than when then when the whole band contributes. Because it was just him and an acoustic guitar, it was more of his ideas. Knowing that the album was really Mikey made me appreciate it even more,”

— Adam Pacheco (11)

 

   “I really liked [the new album]. I read a little about it. Mikey said he never really sat down and wrote songs, and that he found the experience of making this album really therapeutic. It was more personal to his own sound rather than when then when the whole band contributes. Because it was just him and an acoustic guitar, it was more of his ideas. Knowing that the album was really Mikey made me appreciate it even more,” Adam Pacheco (11) said. 

   As far as the context of the album goes, “Everything Seems Like Yesterday” is centered around love. This of course isn’t uncharted territory for the boys as “Hypochondriac” revolved mostly around heartstrings, but Mikey opened up with a softer side this time. He refrains from the usual “angry love” that fans have grown accustomed to. 

   “It’s a change of pace. It’s really similar in content compared to ‘Hypochondriac,’ but the sound has changed. It got slower when compared to ‘You Are Going to Hate This’ which is more rock based,” Evan Carlson (10) said. 

   With a harmonica and acoustic guitar, Mikey sings about missing and loving someone like “it was yesterday.” The soul-filled creation includes song names like “Simple and Strange,” “Leave Me Alone,” “All I Ask,” and seven other calm titles. Overall, the album shows the world a new side of Mikey that fans welcome with open arms. 

   “Usually their songs are not necessarily that emotionally deep, but hearing the titles I see that that’s changed on this album. I guess it’s just Mikey this time, right? It taps more into what’s bothering him, and it explores what he can do more with his music,” Sophia Novelo (10) said.