Again, another YouTuber releases a novel, but is it better than the rest?

Many question the popularity of "Again, But Better," an award winning romance novel written by YouTuber Christine Riccio and got published this past May. However, feedback from MHHS suggest flaws within these doubts.

Again%2C+But+Better+being+scrutinized+on+whether+or+not+it%27s+worth+it%27s+praise.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Again, another YouTuber releases a novel, but is it better than the rest?

Again, But Better being scrutinized on whether or not it's worth it's praise.

Again, But Better being scrutinized on whether or not it's worth it's praise.

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

Again, But Better being scrutinized on whether or not it's worth it's praise.

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

Again, But Better being scrutinized on whether or not it's worth it's praise.

Story by Linh Truong, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






    Christine Riccio, a YouTuber with almost half a million followers, published her debut novel, “Again, But Better,” this past May, and it quickly became a New York Times Bestseller. However, some of her fellow YouTubers suggest that the novel is popular only because of Riccio’s wide influence. 

I’d give this book a chance because it sounds like something I’d be able to relate to. Growing up can be very hard with all the pressure from friends and adults. I think that we only live once, so just go for those risks. If we mess up, that just tells us to not repeat our mistakes,”

— Oriana Allen (10)

  “Again, But Better” is a young adult novel that follows the journey of Shane, a straight-A college student, as she abandons her pre-med major to study abroad and pursue her passion for storytelling. In this journey, Shane encounters new friends, discovers herself, and finds a love that just might last a lifetime. 

    “I would read this book, especially because a lot of kids from this generation usually have to focus on their grades and going to college, so the fact that [Shane’s] focused on her studies and has no friends is relatable. When she accepts the opportunity to study abroad, it shows that just because someone chooses to deviate from their original plan, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re going off path. It just means that they’re living life, which I think is something our generation can learn from,” Abigail Maldonado (12) said.

   Deciding between one’s heart and parental expectations is an inescapable aspect of growing up. Consequently, the fact that the novel revolves around this issue is captivating.           

   “I’d give this book a chance because it sounds like something I’d be able to relate to. Growing up can be very hard with all the pressure from friends and adults. I think that we only live once, so just go for those risks. If we mess up, that just tells us to not repeat our mistakes,”  Oriana Allen (10) said.

   Shane’s ability to survive unfortunate circumstances is also empowering for readers.     

   “I’m pretty sure a lesson you can probably learn from this book is to [understand that] no matter how hard life gets to you, just keep doing what you want to do no matter what,” Julian Ortega (12) said.

    In response to readers’ positive feedback, Riccio demonstrates sympathy. As a former college student who felt isolated, she writes her book in the hope that she can help others much like her older self.   

   “This is for all the teens/young adults/adults who feel like they’ve been left behind. You’re not behind… ‘Again, But Better’ is fiction, but inspired by my own experiences,” she said in her Authors Note.

   It seems “Again, But Better” can help individuals feel less alone when they’re lost in life. Of course, everyone has the right to have their opinions, so whether or not they agree with the positive comments is a personal and valid decision. Yet, with the amount of information out there, perhaps the only way to determine the value of the novel is to actually give it a shot.