Insecurity also affects individuals with society’s “ideal body type”

People are often criticized for expressing their seemingly insignificant insecurities.

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Insecurity also affects individuals with society’s “ideal body type”

A constant belief that there is only one ideal body type lingers across the minds of many, disrupting their perception of who is worthy  of feeling insecure and who isn't.

A constant belief that there is only one ideal body type lingers across the minds of many, disrupting their perception of who is worthy of feeling insecure and who isn't.

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

A constant belief that there is only one ideal body type lingers across the minds of many, disrupting their perception of who is worthy of feeling insecure and who isn't.

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

Photo by Joseph Kamandy

A constant belief that there is only one ideal body type lingers across the minds of many, disrupting their perception of who is worthy of feeling insecure and who isn't.

Story by Antonio Morales Leyva, Opinions Editor

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People are often willing to go to extreme lengths to extinguish their insecurities as it has become more encouraged with the growing age of new crash diets and pimple creams that promise the world. Although most people experience irrational insecurities, many feel as though they are not allowed to express theirs. With the all too common trend of comparing oneself to others, people are oftentimes critical of others who express their insecurities when they are deemed ‘perfect’ by societal norms. Whether someone is thin or is free from blemishes, no one is immune to feelings of insecurity, no matter how conventionally beautiful they are.

I’ve definitely had many people tell me that I shouldn’t be insecure, and I don’t understand why people feel the need to say these things. No one has the right to minimize other people’s insecurities, most of the time it’s just annoying,”

— Chloe Toper (11)

   “People of different shapes and sizes are insecure in their own way, some may think they’re too skinny and others may feel overweight. There are different perceptions of what the ideal body is, and that depends on the person. Insecurities can hurt anyone equally as they stem from within. Anyone’s reason for being insecure is valid. You can’t be blamed for being placed on a pedestal, it makes those people feel like they have to hide their insecurities,” Ashley Virabouth (12) said.

   Validation is often sought when one is insecure, and in many cases, it is easily found. But this isn’t the case when one’s physical insecurities are not as severe in comparison to others. Often times, people feel inclined to hide their insecurities as they are regularly met with annoyed responses when they choose to express them. 

   “I have felt like I need to hide my insecurities. I criticize my weight, but I feel bad when I say it out loud because others think I’m calling them fat too,” Brenda Camacho (12) said.

  One’s insecurities deserve validation as long as they are just that, insecurities–no matter how big or small.

   “I try not to talk about my workout habits because everyone assumes I want to lose weight. I’ve definitely had many people tell me that I shouldn’t be insecure, and I don’t understand why people feel the need to say these things. No one has the right to minimize other people’s insecurities, most of the time it’s just annoying,” Chloe Toper (11) said.

   Whether one is skinny, fat, or configures an hourglass frame, no one should deem themselves or others unworthy of feeling insecure. Many often think that a certain number on the scale or a particular physique will grant them the confidence they lack, but it is important to find a balance between self-improvement and self-acceptance.