With an updated dress code comes the opportunity to follow trends more freely

As Mrs. Flores-Dunda begins her new job as principal, the student body awaits with anticipation for an updated dress code.

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With an updated dress code comes the opportunity to follow trends more freely

As new trends are being set, more people find themselves being dress coded by the campus supervisors.

As new trends are being set, more people find themselves being dress coded by the campus supervisors.

Photo by Gisella Escobar

As new trends are being set, more people find themselves being dress coded by the campus supervisors.

Photo by Gisella Escobar

Photo by Gisella Escobar

As new trends are being set, more people find themselves being dress coded by the campus supervisors.

Story by Autumn Leader, Staff Writer

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   Though style and trends change with each generation, one thing remains the same: clothes are outlets of expression. This year, Mission Hills High School’s Principal, Mrs. Flores-Dunda, has made it her goal to update the elderly dress code, made before the school’s opening in 2004, for students and faculty. The dress code arguably started off more strict on females, however, it has slowly become more flexible for both genders throughout the years. Yet, there is still so much progress to be made.  

   “We just know that times are changing. I’m guessing it’s been several years, if not 15 years since the schools opened, maybe even longer than that if our dress code was adopted over here from San Marcos High,” Mrs. Flores-Dunda said. 

   Students claim to express themselves through their clothing, yet when there are so many restrictions, it can be challenging to do so: Youthful trends such as crop tops and short shorts are deemed inappropriate for a school setting.

I’m guessing it’s been several years, if not 15 years since the schools opened, maybe even longer than that if our dress code was adopted over here from San Marcos High,”

— Mrs. Flores-Dunda

   “In my opinion, I have always liked to keep our school classy, not trashy, and I think that a lot of it is important. The way they’ve always done it in schools is we’re supposed to look professional to a certain point because you are coming to school. Boys have to follow the dress code too, not just girls. I’m doing my job. I don’t make the rules, I just enforce them,” said Lori Brown, a campus supervisor. 

   The school board claims to protect women from being objectified. On the other hand, many females feel restrained by the dress code as they are not given a more flexible and understanding dress code to be able to express themselves at school.

   “The problem with the dress code is the difference between how it affects girls versus guys…Why should we be the ones who are forced to change when the real problem is the way guys view women; We need to change that, not how girls dress,” Chloe Toper (11) said.

   Seeing that women are the predominant group restrained by the dress code and men are being blamed for a large part of it, there is an inconvenience both ways. Administration tends to exaggerate how men look and think about women based on their clothing. With the controversy surrounding the dress code, there lies a greater issue in the conditioning of men, and the restrictions placed on women.

Have you ever been dress coded? Do you think it was for a fair reason?

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